BAME young people share their experiences of Scottish secondary schools

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The report is available to download here.

New research provides an insight into the perceptions and experiences of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic young people in Scottish secondary schools.

Findings from a major survey, conducted by research consultancy EDI Scotland and Intercultural Youth Scotland, identified particular issues related to the reporting of racism in schools. For example, over half of female respondents (51.3%) and male respondents (53.3%) disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement ‘Teachers at my school were knowledgeable about the processes they were required to follow if a racist incident happened at school’.

Worryingly, almost one in three female respondents (29.5%) strongly disagreed with the statement ‘If I experienced a racist incident at my school, I would feel able to tell my teacher’. A smaller proportion of male respondents expressed strong disagreement (16.7%).

The survey ran earlier this autumn and asked young people to share their perceptions and experiences of issues related to teaching and learning, achievements and success, reporting racism, culture and inclusion. It was completed by 110 respondents who identified as BAME.

‘An evidence base for anti-racist action in Scotland’s secondary schools and across wider society.’

The research captured a range of demographic information about respondents, which made it possible to consider the responses of people with different and intersecting identity characteristics.

Khaleda Noon, Founder of Intercultural Youth Scotland, explained: ‘This research clearly shows the difference between the Race Equality Framework and the actual experiences of BAME young people in schools. I am still shocked that nothing has changed since the days when I was at school, I actually feel it is getting worse. Young people must learn to know their rights and stand up for themselves with persistence and bravery, holding perpetrators and leaders accountable, then we will see change’.

Dr Kevin Guyan, who undertook the research as EDI Scotland, said: ‘Our research has identified major issues related to the perceptions and experiences of BAME young people in Scottish secondary schools. However, it was never our intention to undertake this research as an end in itself – we see this research as a form of activism, with the findings presented as an evidence base for anti-racist action in Scotland’s secondary schools and across wider society’.

To download the report click here. For further information on the report contact: EDIScotland@outlook.com

Published by Kevin Guyan

Dr Kevin Guyan is a researcher, writer and activist based in Edinburgh whose work explores the intersection of data and identity.

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